Teen Fatal Car Crash/Accident 2 Teenagers dead October 1999

Teen Fatal Car Crash/Accident 2 Teenagers dead October 1999 from youtube by mumandtwins
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brains of teenagers are different than those of children and adults. New data confirms that this is the case. An article by Jay N. Giedd, MD, of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), published in the April 2008 issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health describes how brain changes in the adolescent brain impact cognition, emotion and behavior Novelty seeking, sensation seeking and risk taking is the basis for considerable reckless behavior of some adolescents.

I WAS 24 WHEN I GOT MY LEARNERS, 25 WHEN I GOT MY P PLATES AND 26 YRS OLD WHEN I GOT MY FULL LICENSE IT DIDN'T HURT ME TO WAIT
I RODE PUSHBIKE, I WALKED, I CAUGHT PUBLIC TRANSPORT
THINK ABOUT IT


IMHO TEENAGERS SHOULD NOT BE DRIVING

The following information is from the Transport SA website READ IT

The number of young drivers killed or seriously injured in road crashes is a serious problem in all states of Australia. Young people aged 16 to 25 make up 13% of Australia's population but account for nearly 25% of road deaths.

Young drivers exhibit certain attributes that contribute to their higher risk of road crashes. These include:
* Lack of experience
* Risk taking behaviour
* The use of older vehicles with less safety features
* Speeding
* Peer pressure

Findings
* Young drivers aged 16 to 20 had the highest rate of all age groups at 150 casualties per 100,000 population (3 to 4 times higher than some)

* Drivers aged 21 to 25 had the second highest rate at 119 casualties per 100,000 population.
On average between 1999-2003, for drivers in the 16-25 year age group who were killed or seriously injured:

* 38% of drivers who were killed had a Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) of .05 or above and 23% of drivers seriously injured recorded a BAC of .05 or above

* 13% were not wearing a seat belt

* 54% occurred on Friday, Saturday or Sunday

* 24% occurred between 4-5pm, 6-8pm or 12-1am

* 53% were on country roads and 42% on roads signposted as 100km/h or 110km/h

* 63% were male.

What types of cars were involved?
Australian research found:

* Young drivers often drive older, cheaper vehicles that are likely to have fewer safety features than newer vehicles

* most young drivers involved in fatal crashes were driving fairly ordinary cars

* very few were driving high performance vehicles.

Night driving
Young drivers are more likely to drive at night and on weekends than older drivers.

* 55% of young drivers aged 16-25 are killed or seriously injured in crashes that occur during the night compared with 37% of other drivers

* Nearly 40% of young driver serious casualties occurred on the weekend, compared with 30% for other drivers.

Driving at night has unique hazards and requires more developed skills. All drivers have an elevated crash risk at night. This is greater for younger drivers because of lack of experience and higher involvement in risk taking.

Driver fatigue may be a factor in up to 30% of fatal crashes and up to 15% of serious injury crashes.

Being tired while driving does not just concern anyone driving a long distance. It can affect shift-workers, parents/carers of young children who haven't had much sleep and also those with sleep problems. It is as much a problem for city as country drivers.
Researchers have found:

* driving after being awake for 17 hours brings a similar crash risk to a blood alcohol level of 0.05

* driving after 24 hours without sleep corresponds to a blood alcohol level of 0.10.

Three main causes of fatigue are:

* lack of sleep

* driving when you would normally be asleep * engaging in long, stressful or repetitive tasks before or during driving.

How can I avoid driver fatigue?

* Planning before you drive is the key to avoiding fatigue. Drivers and those who travel with them should:

* have sufficient sleep before a trip

* allow for regular breaks during long periods of driving, eg 15 minutes every two hours

* if possible, share the driving with someone else.

What do I need to look out for?
Often drivers do not realise they are becoming fatigued, but passengers can help them recognise it.

Watch for:

* impatience, lack of concentration or slow reaction times

* sweaty hands, hunger, thirst, stiffness or cramp

* wandering over the centre-line or road edge

* changes in driving speeds; or poor gear changes

* signs you are feeling drowsy, such as yawning

* sore, heavy eyes and blurred or dim vision

* droning or humming in the ears.

Heavy vehicle drivers
Fatigue is an important health and safety issue for heavy vehicle drivers. An Australian survey in 2000 found that 45% of long distance heavy vehicle drivers had experienced fatigue during their last trip.